Helping the indigenous Awajun protect Peru’s Amazon rainforest – Update: Area declared!

Home to the second-largest portion of the Amazon rainforest after Brazil, the Peruvian Amazon boasts a miraculous array of biodiversity. In the Amazonas region of Peru, the indigenous Awajun people have been protecting the rainforest and its myriad species for centuries. Now, NCI’s local team is working with indigenous Awajun communities and the regional government of Amazonas to establish the Tijae Nain Conservation Concession.

Nature and Culture International has protected ecosystems in Peru including 5.5 million acres of Amazon rainforest
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acres protected

After working successfully with 11 indigenous Awajun communities and the regional government of Amazonas to create the 114,406 acre Pamau Nain Conservation Concession in 2014, our local team is now supporting additional Awajun communities in establishing the Tijae Nain Conservation Concession to protect the rainforest’s rich biodiversity as well as their traditional way of life.

We’re excited to announce that this area was declared by the regional government of Amazonas on October 2, 2015.

Protecting Ecuador’s rich Andean cloud forests

Our Andean Corridor project in Ecuador will span over 400 miles to protect the vital ecosystems of the Andes Mountains, including rich cloud forests and páramos home to endangered species such as the spectacled bear and mountain tapir. The Andes’ eastern slope is considered the world’s number one biodiversity hotspot due to its species richness and diversity, and its ecosystems regulate the natural cycles that produce and renew our air, water and climate. After supporting the creation of four reserves totaling 350,000 acres, NCI’s office in Cuenca is now embarking on an ambitious plan to protect a total of 700,000 acres.

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acres to be protected

We’re working with the municipalities of Santiago de Méndez, Sigsig and Sevilla de Oro, where we are providing extensive technical support for the creation of three new reserves. In addition, we are partnering with FONAPA, the regional water fund, to establish a mechanism that will fund ongoing conservation activities within the reserve. Learn more.

Funding the protection of Colombia’s incredible biodiversity

One of the world’s megadiverse countries, Colombia is home to nearly 10% of the planet’s biodiversity. Worldwide, it ranks first in bird and orchid species and second in plants, butterflies, freshwater fishes and amphibians. In 2014, we began working in the state of Nariño with the regional environmental authority to fund the creation of a protected areas system aimed at safeguarding Nariño’s biodiverse ecosystems, which include high-altitude páramos critical to the water supply, and the endangered Chocó cloud forests.

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acres to be protected

These four protected areas will span roughly 71,750 acres across a variety of ecosystems, including Colombia’s Azufral volcano and stunning sulfur lake. Through the implementation of a co-management model, communities living in or near these reserves will be empowered to conserve their natural resources on their terms, and will benefit from an improved water supply.

Preserving Bolivia’s key watershed ecosystems with local partners

Southern Bolivia is home to a rich mix of ecosystems, from the lush, species-rich foothills of the Andes to the expansive plains of the Cháco dry forest. We’ve begun working in the region of Santa Cruz through a partnership with Natura Bolivia, a local NGO that conserves key ecosystems alongside communities and has helped protect the water supply for two million people. With exciting opportunities to create new municipal reserves, our goal is to protect 200,000 acres over the next two years.

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acres to be protected

Seeing the tangible benefits of watershed conservation, many municipalities in the Andean foothills of Santa Cruz are eager to declare municipal reserves that will help preserve their water supply and that of those living in the Cháco – Bolivia’s hottest region. By establishing a water use fee to fund conservation activities, these municipalities can sustain long term protection of these key areas.